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Important information about child support

Child support in the state of Florida is determined by the Florida Child Support Guidelines. These guidelines take into account the income of both parents, the number of overnight stays the child has with each parent, and any other relevant factors.

The non-custodial parent is typically responsible for paying child support to the custodial parent. The amount of child support is determined by using a formula that considers the income of both parents and the number of overnight stays the child has with each parent.

In Florida, child support payments are typically made through the Florida State Disbursement Unit (SDU). The SDU is responsible for collecting and distributing child support payments. Non-custodial parents are required to make their child support payments to the SDU, which will then distribute the funds to the custodial parent.

Child support payments can be modified in certain circumstances, such as a change in the income of one of the parents or a change in the number of overnight stays the child has with each parent. Either parent can petition the court to modify the child support order.

Additionally, the court can also order additional support for the child such as medical expenses or daycare.

It is important to note that failure to pay child support can result in serious consequences, including wage garnishment, suspension of driver’s license, or even imprisonment.

If a parent is unable to make their child support payments due to a change in circumstances, they should contact the other parent and/or the court to request a modification of the child support order.

In Florida, both parents have a legal responsibility to support their child financially, regardless of whether they are married or not. The court will take into account the income and resources of both parents when determining child support.

It is also important to note that child support obligations do not end automatically when the child reaches 18 years old. In Florida, child support obligations continue until the child turns 18 or graduates from high school, whichever occurs later.

In summary, child support in Florida is determined by the Florida Child Support Guidelines, which takes into account the income of both parents and the number of overnight stays the child has with each parent. Child support payments are typically made through the Florida State Disbursement Unit and failure to pay can result in serious consequences. Child support can be modified under certain circumstances and both parents have a legal responsibility to financially support their child.